surisburnbook
surisburnbook:

Pink and her husband are getting some criticism after taking their two-year-old daughter Willow for a ride a gasoline bicycle (?).
I don’t like danger, dirt, or anything you can’t ride sidesaddle, but to each her own, I guess. I think the lesson here is if you’re going to do something that might bother people, and you’re one of those people who gets bothered by people getting bothered, maybe just keep it off Instagram.

surisburnbook:

Pink and her husband are getting some criticism after taking their two-year-old daughter Willow for a ride a gasoline bicycle (?).

I don’t like danger, dirt, or anything you can’t ride sidesaddle, but to each her own, I guess. I think the lesson here is if you’re going to do something that might bother people, and you’re one of those people who gets bothered by people getting bothered, maybe just keep it off Instagram.

futurejournalismproject
futurejournalismproject:

Verifying Sources on Twitter
The New York Times’ Jennifer Preston is profiled on the Twitter Blog about how she uses the service to report the news. 

To help identify eye-witnesses at the scene, I’ll set up a search in TweetDeck or take a look at Topsy. I’ll sometimes ask my own Twitter community for help. NPR’s Andy Carvin (@ACarvin) showed us how to mobilize a community on Twitter to strengthen his reporting during the Arab Spring. My colleague, Brian Stelter (@BrianStelter), does a marvelous job on Twitter getting and verifying information for his [television] beat.
For me, the most effective way to find eyewitnesses is Twitter’s advanced search. Simply type in a keyword and location in the field that says “near this place”. The tool will produce Tweets from people who included that location in their profile. I will often type pic.twitter.com into a field to get images from that location.

Read through for the rest: Verifying Tweets when news breaks.

futurejournalismproject:

Verifying Sources on Twitter

The New York Times’ Jennifer Preston is profiled on the Twitter Blog about how she uses the service to report the news. 

To help identify eye-witnesses at the scene, I’ll set up a search in TweetDeck or take a look at Topsy. I’ll sometimes ask my own Twitter community for help. NPR’s Andy Carvin (@ACarvin) showed us how to mobilize a community on Twitter to strengthen his reporting during the Arab Spring. My colleague, Brian Stelter (@BrianStelter), does a marvelous job on Twitter getting and verifying information for his [television] beat.

For me, the most effective way to find eyewitnesses is Twitter’s advanced search. Simply type in a keyword and location in the field that says “near this place”. The tool will produce Tweets from people who included that location in their profile. I will often type pic.twitter.com into a field to get images from that location.

Read through for the rest: Verifying Tweets when news breaks.